Mary Stewart Reading Week – This Rough Magic

I’m so pleased that Anbolyn’s Mary Stewart Reading Week gave me the incentive to reread This Rough Magic. I read all Mary Stewart’s novels as a teenager in the 1970s & I bought several of the Hodder reprints a few years ago but have only read a couple of them. I was on holidays from work last week – which was meant to be relaxing but didn’t turn out that way – so a trip to Corfu, even if it was only in my imagination, was just what I needed.

Lucy Waring is an actress whose career has hit a bit of a lull. She’s happy to swap dreary London & the demise of the play she was in, for a holiday with her sister, Phyllida, on Corfu. Phyllida is married to a rich Italian banker whose family own not only the Castello dei Fiori, but also two smaller villas nearby. Phyllida & Lucy are staying at the Villa Forli while the other, Villa Rotha, is rented to Godfrey Manning, a writer & photographer. Lucy is intrigued to discover that the Castello is home to Sir Julian Gale, one of the most famous actors of his generation. Sir Julian had suffered some kind of breakdown after the deaths of his wife & daughter in a car crash & had become a recluse. Sir Julian’s son, Max, is staying at the Castello while working on a film score but Lucy doesn’t expect to see very much of them as their privacy is fiercely guarded by their gardener, Adonis, known as Adoni, who lives up to his name in looks.

Sir Julian has been visiting Corfu for many years & one of his most cherished theories is that the island is the site of Shakespeare’s Tempest. He is godfather to Spiro & Miranda, the twin children of the Castello’s housekeeper, Maria. According to Phyllida, the relationship may be even closer &, even though Spiro is supposed to be named after the patron saint of Corfu, St Spiridion, Phyllida is sure that the reference to Prospero is significant. While Miranda helps her mother at Villa Forli, Spiro has been employed to work for Godfrey Manning. As well as working on Manning’s boat, he also models for photographs with a dolphin he’s tamed. Lucy encounters the dolphin on one of her swims when someone starts taking potshots at it & she dives in to drive it out to sea. She also meets Max Gale on this occasion & is unimpressed by his manners.

On one of Godfrey’s night sailing trips to take photos, Spiro falls overboard & is presumed drowned. Soon after, a fisherman suspected of smuggling goods to communist Albania just across the ocean, is also drowned. On the night of his death, Lucy had seen this man,Yanni, on his way up to the Castello & she suspects Max of some involvement in the smuggling, especially given his suspicious behaviour when Yanni’s body is found. By this time, she has met Sir Julian & been entranced by his stories of the theatre & his theories about the Tempest. Max has been watchful of his father & slightly suspicious of Lucy, making her wonder why he doesn’t encourage visitors. Her increasing attraction to him is just another complication. Godfrey Manning is attractive, intelligent & very attentive to Lucy but could he have other motives for being on Corfu? Lucy becomes involved in the lives of all these people & will risk her own life to uncover the truth.

This Rough Magic had just the right combination of romance, suspense & action all set in a gorgeous location. The lush descriptions of the Castello’s gardens, the beaches & the surrounding countryside were so evocative.

After the dappled dimness of the wood, it took some moments before one could do more than blink at the dazzle of colour. Straight ahead of me an arras of wisteria hung fully fifteen feet, and below it there were roses. Somewhere to one side was a thicket of purple judas-trees, and apple-blossom glinting with the wings of working bees. Arum lilies grew in a damp corner, and some other lily with petals like gold parchment, transparent in the light. And everywhere, roses. … I must have stood stock still for some minutes, looking about me, dizzied with the scent and the sunlight. I had forgotten roses could smell like that.

Lucy has found her way into the Castello’s gardens & Sir Julian is about to greet her with a quotation from the Tempest. Lucy’s encounters with the dolphin in the bay are also almost mystical. She & Max save the dolphin when it has beached itself, she swims with it & it appears at a crucial moment when Lucy is in danger. It all seems part of the magical quality of the island with its legends & religious parades, a simpler side of island life to be contrasted with the deadly serious business of evil treachery that also has its place. The last third of the book is almost unbearably tense & I sat up late one night to finish the book because I couldn’t resist reading just a little more. Lucy is a resourceful heroine & although there’s not much doubt where her heart lies, her ability to stay out of trouble & to stay alive is more dubious. What acting talent she has comes in very handy before the adventure ends.

I’m not sure that This Rough Magic fits too many categories in Leaves and Pages wonderful Gothic Romance primer here but I just wanted to point any Gothic Romance fans to her blog anyway. I’m in awe of the amount of reading & reviewing that Leaves and Pages does & her blog is eclectic, funny & full of great recommendations of the kind of books I enjoy reading. In the post I’ve linked to, she reviews Mary Stewart’s Nine Coaches Waiting as well as Madeleine Brent’s Tregaron’s Daughter & Georgette Heyer’s Cousin Kate, rating all three according to her own taste as well as the Gothic Mystery criteria. Mary Stewart comes out on top with 10/10. Very appropriate for Mary Stewart Reading Week.

Anglophilebooks.comCopies of This Rough Magic, as well as several other Mary Stewart titles are available from Anglophile Books.

16 thoughts on “Mary Stewart Reading Week – This Rough Magic

  1. Snap! I've just downloaded Death in Berlin from Open Library. I remember reading them all when they were first published but I want to read them again & several seem to be available at OL. One book leads to another…

    Like

  2. I posted about this one for MSRW too (along with three others I read this summer). What I love about them is they are great “escape” reading but not in a tawdry way. You can tell great intelligence and care went into creating these entertainments, they are not throwaway fluff.

    Like

  3. Yes, I agree. The beautifully described settings are such a big part of MS's appeal & her heroines play a big part in their own destiny, they're not just swept along by events or by men although the romance is always important as well.

    Like

  4. This was the first Mary Stewart I read, so I have very fond memories of it, although I was a bit worried it might go all weirdly supernatural at one point. But the settings she evokes are just gorgeous, aren't they? One wants immediately to pack a bag and go.

    Like

  5. Yes, even though I hate hot weather & don't enjoy summer at all, reading about Corfu made me want to be there. The dolphin theme definitely had a mystical element but manages to keep just this side of the supernatural. I'm reading Touch Not The Cat at the moment which definitely has a supernatural element to it but it's a later novel from the 70s.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s